temporary assistantTara Donovan Studio(Long Island City NY)
gluing stuff to stuff, non toxic. can wear headphones. $10 hr. 10-6 M-FOctober 14th- November 8thsend resume to claire@taradonovanstudios.comstudio will make calls on Oct. 2nd and 3rd and set up interviews for week of 7th.
[NYFA]

temporary assistant
Tara Donovan Studio
(Long Island City NY)

gluing stuff to stuff, non toxic. can wear headphones. $10 hr. 10-6 M-F
October 14th- November 8th
send resume to claire@taradonovanstudios.com
studio will make calls on Oct. 2nd and 3rd and set up interviews for week of 7th.

[NYFA]

1 year ago & david zwirner
1 year ago
Westreich and Wagner Discuss Collecting, for Love and Money, at 92YTribeca

By Andrew Russeth 4/25 4:54pm


Earlier this month Phaidon released Collecting Art for Love, Money and More, a book by husband and wife collectors and advisors Ethan Wagner and Thea Westreich, and by at least one measure, Mr. Wagner explained during a panel at the 92nd Street Y in Tribeca last night, it’s already a success.
The art world and its denizens, he said while holding his wife’s hand, “have made our lives together—and even before we were together, 22 years ago—so fascinating, that—we thought, if we put something down and created a book, if one person picked up that book and started to collect and went on a journey that was somewhat comparable to the one that we’ve enjoyed, that would be an achievement.” The other day just such a thing happened: a gentleman from Istanbul called Mr. Wagner to say, “I picked up your book, I read your book, and I’m going to collect art!”
The book is a succinct primer for those who are new to the art world, explaining the history and machinations of its participants, institutions and rituals. It’s also handsomely illustrated with photos from exhibitions, studios and collectors’ homes, like a beautiful Roe Ethridge snap of Agnes Gund’s dining room, which features Lichtenstein’s 1962 Masterpiece.
Also on hand were Christie’s rainmaker Amy Cappellazzo (“I’m like a currency trader in something that one percent of the one percent want”), Artists Space’s director, Stefan Kalmár and the 92nd Street Y’s Michele Thompson, who pitched questions.
How should people who are interested in art get started? Mr. Kalmár: “Get involved with an art organization, and see a lot.” Ms. Cappellazzo: “Buy something you love, followed by something that terrifies you and makes you uneasy and scares the shit out of you. You should be forced to grow.” That applies emotionally, intellectually and, for the record, financially. (“I do have a soft spot for people who collect completely out of their means—they’re just like reckless lovers,” she said. “I know people with no 401K, no retirement, no savings for college, four kids, collecting art. It’s like, ‘Really?’”)
Amid all the talk of acquisition, Mr. Kalmár made the important point that in recent years, “we seem to forget that the artist is not producing artworks to be collected, necessarily.”
“Some of them are,” Mr. Cappellazzo said.
“Yes, but the good ones probably don’t,” he replied, adding later that, in comparison to buying art like just another product, “I think there are far more interesting or complex ways to engage with artists.” Great collectors, like the Menils, he said, “listen to artists, and actually use their money not necessarily to buy something but to produce something together for a special occasion or a special context.”
“Parenthetically, Thea and I collect that way,” Wagner said. He had a tough question for Ms. Cappellazzo about her clients at Christie’s. “What percentage of them are collecting in the way we were just talking about, where they’re making a serious inquiry into the intentionality and the thinking of the artist by engaging with the artist, and [what percentage] could care less?”
“I try not to judge the way people love something,” she said. “So I don’t really get judgmental about that. I see people who are flawed in many ways, are human, that love art in a certain way that redeems them to me. And I can find them immensely likable because they’re passionate about something that I’m passionate about.”
In the audience, an enthusiastic young man in a suit was curious about the mysteries of art prices. “How do you establish a bid-ask spread?” he asked. “As someone interested in getting involved in artwork, how does one that is starting out do price discovery?”
Basically art’s worth what someone will pay, Ms. Cappellazzo explained. “Someone offered me today a masterpiece by Leon Golub,” she said. “I thought, ‘You can buy five of these for the price of one Nate Lowman right now!’”
She emphasized that she wasn’t commenting on Mr. Lowman’s work, just making the point that money operates in peculiar ways in the market. “We’re not really pricing a work of art,” she said. “We’re pricing what money means to the five people who might be interested in it.”
Another audience member asked about the panelists’s first art buys, and Ms. Westreich grimaced and laughed.
Ms. Cappellazzo’s was a $500 Kiki Smith self-portrait photograph from Brooke Alexander at Art Chicago. Mr. Kalmár has actually never purchased an artwork. Mr. Wagner’s was a large Stanley Boxer abstraction. He bought it before he met Ms. Westreich. “I have no idea where that painting is today,” he said. “But that sometimes happens in collecting.”
And what of Ms. Westreich? It was years ago, she said, when she was living in D.C., working as a museum docent. “A guy named Lowell Nesbitt was all the rage there at the time,” she said. “I bought a great big beautiful yellow tulip.”
“My painting was also yellow!” Ms. Wagner crowed.
[NY Observer]

Westreich and Wagner Discuss Collecting, for Love and Money, at 92YTribeca

Earlier this month Phaidon released Collecting Art for Love, Money and More, a book by husband and wife collectors and advisors Ethan Wagner and Thea Westreich, and by at least one measure, Mr. Wagner explained during a panel at the 92nd Street Y in Tribeca last night, it’s already a success.

The art world and its denizens, he said while holding his wife’s hand, “have made our lives together—and even before we were together, 22 years ago—so fascinating, that—we thought, if we put something down and created a book, if one person picked up that book and started to collect and went on a journey that was somewhat comparable to the one that we’ve enjoyed, that would be an achievement.” The other day just such a thing happened: a gentleman from Istanbul called Mr. Wagner to say, “I picked up your book, I read your book, and I’m going to collect art!”

The book is a succinct primer for those who are new to the art world, explaining the history and machinations of its participants, institutions and rituals. It’s also handsomely illustrated with photos from exhibitions, studios and collectors’ homes, like a beautiful Roe Ethridge snap of Agnes Gund’s dining room, which features Lichtenstein’s 1962 Masterpiece.

Also on hand were Christie’s rainmaker Amy Cappellazzo (“I’m like a currency trader in something that one percent of the one percent want”), Artists Space’s director, Stefan Kalmár and the 92nd Street Y’s Michele Thompson, who pitched questions.

How should people who are interested in art get started? Mr. Kalmár: “Get involved with an art organization, and see a lot.” Ms. Cappellazzo: “Buy something you love, followed by something that terrifies you and makes you uneasy and scares the shit out of you. You should be forced to grow.” That applies emotionally, intellectually and, for the record, financially. (“I do have a soft spot for people who collect completely out of their means—they’re just like reckless lovers,” she said. “I know people with no 401K, no retirement, no savings for college, four kids, collecting art. It’s like, ‘Really?’”)

Amid all the talk of acquisition, Mr. Kalmár made the important point that in recent years, “we seem to forget that the artist is not producing artworks to be collected, necessarily.”

“Some of them are,” Mr. Cappellazzo said.

“Yes, but the good ones probably don’t,” he replied, adding later that, in comparison to buying art like just another product, “I think there are far more interesting or complex ways to engage with artists.” Great collectors, like the Menils, he said, “listen to artists, and actually use their money not necessarily to buy something but to produce something together for a special occasion or a special context.”

“Parenthetically, Thea and I collect that way,” Wagner said. He had a tough question for Ms. Cappellazzo about her clients at Christie’s. “What percentage of them are collecting in the way we were just talking about, where they’re making a serious inquiry into the intentionality and the thinking of the artist by engaging with the artist, and [what percentage] could care less?”

“I try not to judge the way people love something,” she said. “So I don’t really get judgmental about that. I see people who are flawed in many ways, are human, that love art in a certain way that redeems them to me. And I can find them immensely likable because they’re passionate about something that I’m passionate about.”

In the audience, an enthusiastic young man in a suit was curious about the mysteries of art prices. “How do you establish a bid-ask spread?” he asked. “As someone interested in getting involved in artwork, how does one that is starting out do price discovery?”

Basically art’s worth what someone will pay, Ms. Cappellazzo explained. “Someone offered me today a masterpiece by Leon Golub,” she said. “I thought, ‘You can buy five of these for the price of one Nate Lowman right now!’”

She emphasized that she wasn’t commenting on Mr. Lowman’s work, just making the point that money operates in peculiar ways in the market. “We’re not really pricing a work of art,” she said. “We’re pricing what money means to the five people who might be interested in it.”

Another audience member asked about the panelists’s first art buys, and Ms. Westreich grimaced and laughed.

Ms. Cappellazzo’s was a $500 Kiki Smith self-portrait photograph from Brooke Alexander at Art Chicago. Mr. Kalmár has actually never purchased an artwork. Mr. Wagner’s was a large Stanley Boxer abstraction. He bought it before he met Ms. Westreich. “I have no idea where that painting is today,” he said. “But that sometimes happens in collecting.”

And what of Ms. Westreich? It was years ago, she said, when she was living in D.C., working as a museum docent. “A guy named Lowell Nesbitt was all the rage there at the time,” she said. “I bought a great big beautiful yellow tulip.”

“My painting was also yellow!” Ms. Wagner crowed.

[NY Observer]

NYFA Classifieds InternNew York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA)(Brooklyn NY)
Department: Information & Services Reports To: Associate Program Officer, Digital AdvertisingStatus: Part-Time, 15 - 20 hours a week, unpaid, reimbursement for monthly MetrocardStart date: ImmediatelyABOUT NYFA:The New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) is a nonprofit arts service provider, providing comprehensive support for artists in the United States. NYFA’s mission is to empower artists at critical stages in their creative lives. Through its grants, fiscal sponsorship, information services, and programs, NYFA works with artists and arts organizations throughout New York State and other parts of the country to develop, assist, and highlight artists to the public.The Information & Services Department provides artists and small arts organizations with accessibility, professional training, public engagement opportunities and program support. Referred to as the ultimate career development tool, NYFA Classifieds (www.nyfa.org/classifieds) is a virtual one-stop shop for the latest arts-related jobs and internships, opportunities and services for artists and event listings nationwide.  RESPONSIBILITIES:NYFA is seeking an intern to support our efforts to grow NYFA Classifieds and increase numbers of advertisers and users, on a local, national and international level. Duties will include:- Conducting market research to identify prospective advertisers and website users- Assisting with outreach to advertisers via telephone, e-mail and possibly social media- Brainstorming new ideas for online marketing- Providing general support to the NYFA Classifieds department- Other duties as assigned, including data entry (including database development), filing and day-to-day operation support  QUALIFICATIONS:* Strong interest in contemporary art and artists in all disciplines including visual, performance and literary arts. * Detail-oriented and strong written, oral and communication skills* Academic or professional experience with marketing, research, writing and editing preferred * Ability to work well collaboratively and independently* Experience with social media platforms (Facebook, LinkedIn, etc.)* Experience with Microsoft Office and Excel required; some HTML experience a plusA minimum of a three-month assignment is expected. Academic credit is encouraged and can be arranged with the intern’s college or university.TO APPLY:Please email cover letter and resume to Michon Ashmore at mashmore@nyfa.org with “NYFA Classifieds Intern” in the subject line. No phone calls please. Only applicants invited to interview will be contacted. New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
[NYFA]

NYFA Classifieds Intern
New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA)
(Brooklyn NY)

Department: Information & Services 
Reports To: Associate Program Officer, Digital Advertising
Status: Part-Time, 15 - 20 hours a week, unpaid, reimbursement for monthly Metrocard
Start date: Immediately

ABOUT NYFA:
The New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) is a nonprofit arts service provider, providing comprehensive support for artists in the United States. NYFA’s mission is to empower artists at critical stages in their creative lives. Through its grants, fiscal sponsorship, information services, and programs, NYFA works with artists and arts organizations throughout New York State and other parts of the country to develop, assist, and highlight artists to the public.

The Information & Services Department provides artists and small arts organizations with accessibility, professional training, public engagement opportunities and program support. Referred to as the ultimate career development tool, NYFA Classifieds (www.nyfa.org/classifieds) is a virtual one-stop shop for the latest arts-related jobs and internships, opportunities and services for artists and event listings nationwide.  

RESPONSIBILITIES:
NYFA is seeking an intern to support our efforts to grow NYFA Classifieds and increase numbers of advertisers and users, on a local, national and international level. 

Duties will include:
- Conducting market research to identify prospective advertisers and website users
- Assisting with outreach to advertisers via telephone, e-mail and possibly social media
- Brainstorming new ideas for online marketing
- Providing general support to the NYFA Classifieds department
- Other duties as assigned, including data entry (including database development), filing and day-to-day operation support  

QUALIFICATIONS:
* Strong interest in contemporary art and artists in all disciplines including visual, performance and literary arts. 
* Detail-oriented and strong written, oral and communication skills
* Academic or professional experience with marketing, research, writing and editing preferred 
* Ability to work well collaboratively and independently
* Experience with social media platforms (Facebook, LinkedIn, etc.)
* Experience with Microsoft Office and Excel required; some HTML experience a plus

A minimum of a three-month assignment is expected. Academic credit is encouraged and can be arranged with the intern’s college or university.

TO APPLY:
Please email cover letter and resume to Michon Ashmore at mashmore@nyfa.org with “NYFA Classifieds Intern” in the subject line. No phone calls please. 

Only applicants invited to interview will be contacted. 

New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

[NYFA]

1 year ago & DONE
Industrial Design InternTrevor Paglen(New York NY)
Industrial Design intern wanted to assist artist in brainstorming, planning, designing and modeling simple satellites and sculptures inspired by spacecraft design.  Candidates with mechanical background preferred.  Knowledge of materials and weathering/corrosion preferred.  Intern will work closely with the artist and studio manager during all phases of the project.  Knowledge of CAD is mandatory; a significant portion of this internship will be translating ideas and sketches into CAD models.Days/times are flexible.By May 10th please submit a cover letter, resume, and work samples to dave.paglenstudio@gmail.com- - - - - - -About the artist:Trevor Paglen’s work deliberately blurs lines between science, contemporary art, journalism, and other disciplines to construct unfamiliar, yet meticulously researched ways to see and interpret the world around us. Additional information available at www.paglen.com
Website: http://www.paglen.com
[NYFA]

Industrial Design Intern
Trevor Paglen
(New York NY)

Industrial Design intern wanted to assist artist in brainstorming, planning, designing and modeling simple satellites and sculptures inspired by spacecraft design.  Candidates with mechanical background preferred.  Knowledge of materials and weathering/corrosion preferred.  Intern will work closely with the artist and studio manager during all phases of the project.  Knowledge of CAD is mandatory; a significant portion of this internship will be translating ideas and sketches into CAD models.

Days/times are flexible.

By May 10th please submit a cover letter, resume, and work samples to dave.paglenstudio@gmail.com

- - - - - - -
About the artist:
Trevor Paglen’s work deliberately blurs lines between science, contemporary art, journalism, and other disciplines to construct unfamiliar, yet meticulously researched ways to see and interpret the world around us. Additional information available at www.paglen.com

Website: http://www.paglen.com

[NYFA]

Assistant Forest SchoolTeacherBrooklyn Forest(Brooklyn NY)
$18-25/hrBrooklyn Forest offers outdoor classes to parents and their young children in Prospect Park. We need to hire some assistant teachers to begin work immediately. The classes are simple, Waldorf inspired, and incorporate singing, finger plays, and digging in the mud. If you can sing, have experience working with children, know how to talk to parents, have leadership experience, and graduated from a competitive college, we would like to hear from you. Fill out the application here:http://brooklynforest.org/application-form/
Website: http://brooklynforest.org
[NYFA]

Assistant Forest SchoolTeacher
Brooklyn Forest
(Brooklyn NY)

$18-25/hr

Brooklyn Forest offers outdoor classes to parents and their young children in Prospect Park. We need to hire some assistant teachers to begin work immediately. The classes are simple, Waldorf inspired, and incorporate singing, finger plays, and digging in the mud. If you can sing, have experience working with children, know how to talk to parents, have leadership experience, and graduated from a competitive college, we would like to hear from you. Fill out the application here:

http://brooklynforest.org/application-form/

Website: http://brooklynforest.org

[NYFA]

1 year ago & okay yeah why not